Totally Smitten With That Cheap Bitch

In the ever expanding world of fashion & lifestyle bloggers Emmy is a breath of fresh air. Her no-holds-barred approach to writing & complete personal honesty with her thriftastic topics on That Cheap Bitch make her posts a hilarious pleasure to read.

…and I once again seem to have found a forthright fashionista cut from the same cloth as my twenty-something self:

Let’s get to know this outspoken pixie & discover her fab thrifting tips…

“Yes, I do have a gif of myself eating pizza…”

“Drop crotch pants are like bad-ass pajamas. They’re comfy like sweats, but I can wear them to the office. They’re low-effort and go with damn near everything, yet the general population seems to think they’re fancy.”

I work in digital media, and I find quite a few things about “female interest” web content troubling. A lot of content for women is made by men. Although analytics are important when it comes to building your audience and brand (duh), corporations tend to view their audience as sheep more than they do intelligent individuals.

"Every summer, once it’s hit about 98 degrees and rising and my face starts melting off in the subway, I start planning what I’m going to wear in the fall. SO MANY LAYERS! SO MANY HATS! COMBAT BOOTS ALL OF THE TIME"

“Every summer, once it hits 98 degrees (& climbing) and my face starts melting off in the subway, I start planning what I’m going to wear in the fall. SO MANY LAYERS! SO MANY HATS! COMBAT BOOTS ALL OF THE TIME!”

Big name fashion editorial also tends to focus on elitism and the idea that to be glamorous, pretty, and successful, you must have money and expensive clothes. Not only is that completely untrue, it also excludes 99% of women because they don’t have a massive expendable income. And yet, brands like Vogue, digital sites like Style.com, even smaller and more unique sites like The Man Repeller, focus almost exclusively on designer, high-end clothing. I couldn’t find the type of style content I was looking for online, so I decided I had to create it myself.

"I got this 2013 VMA T-shirt fo FREEEE, and I wear it at least once a week. It’s super soft, not-too-big and not-too-small."

“I got this 2013 VMA T-shirt fo FREEEE, and I wear it at least once a week. It’s super soft, not-too-big and not-too-small.I can pair this graphic with an edgy skirt or colored jeans for a low-effort trendy look… “

 I wanted to create a site that focused on affordable clothing, had an original and sassy voice, and assumed the audience was intelligent enough to see beyond silly click-bait headlines and content created simply for the traffic. I have several contributing writers that post on the site as well, and more in the works.

“I had a dramatic break-up with my pants…I stole that blue button up shirt that I’m wearing under my leopard coat from a community theatre costume closet when I was a senior in high school! It’s held up really well and is has been a staple in my wardrobe for years. + an appearance from my favorite hat!”

As I never wanted That Cheap Bitch to be ‘just’ a personal style blog, in a few months we’re going to run a Kickstarter campaign so we can hire a developer to create an original site, buy video equipment, and most importantly, pay our contributing writers. There’s a massive economic gap in journalism and entertainment. Often when you’re first starting out as a writer/videographer/content creator, you’re expected to work for free. Entry level jobs pay measly salaries or hourly rates. That Cheap Bitch has talented, hard-working writers who should be paid for their work.

“I had my face put on a t-shirt, turns out I’m a sassy kitty.”

Emmy’s Top 5 Thrifting Tips:

1. This is less of a tip than it is just an idea: thrifting takes practice. When I first started thrifting in high school, I bought a lot of stuff that ended up just taking up space in my closet. Part of me wants to say, “don’t buy something unless you know you really will wear it!” But at the same time, if you’re shopping at real, smelly, charity fund thrift stores and not consignment stores, usually their stuff is pretty cheap. Sometimes you just have to take a risk! Now that I’ve been shopping at thrift stores for a while, I buy less stuff that I never end up wearing. Part of that might be from developing a pretty distinctive style as I’ve gotten older, but I think the experience of learning how to discern what is worth my money and space is just something I’ve learned from experience.

2. Give yourself time to thrift. I’m a video editor by day, and keeping with the blog, plus my day job, as well as working on other creative side projects to build my portfolio is pretty exhausting! Sometimes I’ll walk into my favorite Salvation Army after work and only putz around for a few minutes. It’s a waste of time! I try to put aside a few hours once a month to really explore their stock. If you don’t take the time to search, you’ll end up missing out on great finds!

3. If you’re not crafty, don’t convince yourself you are. This is something I do often. I’ll think, “I’ll hem this dress and make it sleeveless!” Not only do I have very limited sewing experience, but I also have almost no free time on my hands. So while a lot of DIY queens say, “modify your thrift store finds,” my advice is the opposite. If you don’t have the time and you don’t have the skills (like me), don’t waste your money and space on less than acceptable merchandise.

4. I used to only shop at charity thrift stores and vehemently refused to shop at consignment stores. My logic was, consignment stores just sell disposable fast fashion clothes for a jacked up price. Now that I live in New York City though, I love consignment stores! When I was younger, I never felt too inclined to buy clothes from quality brands. I was fine with wearing exclusively fast fashion brands mixed with some thrift store finds. But now I’d prefer my clothes to last longer than a few washes. I swear by Buffalo Exchange here in NYC, and they have stores across the country as well. I’ve bought designer shoes in great shape for $20, brands like American Apparel and Banana Republic dresses and tops for under $15. And they don’t fall apart in the washer! This is new for me.

5. Find a great vintage store and never stray. Along the same lines as my distaste for consignment stores, I never shopped at vintage stores, until I found one that didn’t charge an insane markup. I am in love with L Train Vintage and No Relation Vintage here in New York. They sell genuine vintage dresses in the $15-$30 price range, vintage tops, skirts, pants, etc. for around $10. So do your research, find a reasonably priced place, and stick to it.

A huge thank-you & bear squeeze to Emmy for sharing her awesomeness!

"This blazer was given to me by a friend whose ex-girlfriend left it at his place! It's a Banana Republic blazer that I never would have bought on my own, but I love it! It's a great piece to throw on over a casual outfit for a polished look. The pants are also from Buffalo Exchange, they cost $8. The plaid print makes any basic outfit something different. "

“This blazer was given to me by a friend whose ex-girlfriend left it at his place! It’s a Banana Republic blazer that I never would have bought on my own, but I love it! It’s a great piece to throw on over a casual outfit for a polished look. The pants are also from Buffalo Exchange, they cost $8. The plaid print makes any basic outfit something different. “

Now head on over to That Cheap Bitch, discover the cool contributors and snag some thrifty beauty tips & sassy style inspiration!

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